All natural ant control

Homemade Ant Killers: Recipes & Tips

They are mainly looking for two things: food and water. If it’s getting cold outside, they also like to settle in to find shelter. Below I’ve listed various home remedies and solutions for control (along with some tidbits of information on their behavior and habits).

Here’s a list of spray cleaner recipes you can try…

Clean countertops and surfaces well with one of the cleaners below, these can also be used to spray them directly.

Vinegar

Vinegar & Water (50/50 mix)

Cider Vinegar & Water (50/50 mix)

One of these essential oils: Peppermint, Lavender, Eucalyptus, Tea Tree Oil, Witch Hazel Extract (1 tablespoon) plus water–per spray bottle

Liquid Dish Detergent & Water (about 1 tablespoon detergent, fill spray bottle with water).

Did You Know: Ants leave a scented trail for each other so they can easily find their way back to the jackpot (the food source in your house). Trails can be both visible and invisible to human eyes, but they can follow the trails with ease. Washing away these trails will confuse them and make it more difficult to find their favorite places. Making your own cleaners with the above ingredients also adds a repellent that they will avoid.

The type of food they look for is either sugar or protein, it depends on what the needs of the colony are at the time. This is why a “tried and true” recipe that came highly recommended doesn’t work for you, the bait holds no interest for the particular critters in your home.

Here are a few homemade bait recipes you can try…

Sugar

2 TBS Boric Acid (Borax)
Jam (or Jelly, Honey, Maple Syrup)

Mix the boric acid with the jam or jelly to make a paste. Slather it on a piece of paper, a plate or in a covered container with holes. You may have to adjust amount of Boric Acid if they seem to eat up the bait like crazy, but are getting fatter from it instead of dying.

Sugar

2 cups Sugar
1 cup Water
2 TBS Boric Acid (Borax)

Mix and place in small saucers around the house.

Protein

2 TBS Boric Acid (Borax)
Peanut Butter or Bacon Grease

Mix and set out in mounds on pieces of paper or plates.

Sugar

1 cup Confectioners Sugar
2 TBS Boric Acid (Borax)

Leave this in little mounds or in covered containers with holes.

Sugar Bait

2 TBS Molasses
1 TBS Yeast
1 TBS Sugar

Mix and place mounds on paper, plates or in covered containers with holes.

Important: When baiting so they’ll bring poison back to the nest, resist the temptation to kill them when you see them. You want them to live and take big juicy pieces of poisoned bait back to the nest for the rest of the colony to feast on.

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Five Ways to Use Eggshells in Your Garden

A normal person looks at an egg and thinks “omelet” or “frittata.” A gardener (especially one who tends to be on the obsessive end of the spectrum) looks at an egg and thinks “yes! Eggshells!”

Five Ways to Use Eggshells in Your Garden

1. Add crushed eggshells to the bottom of planting holes, especially for tomatoes, peppers, and eggplant. These crops are susceptible to blossom end rot, which is caused by calcium deficiency. While this deficiency is most often caused by improper watering, there’s no harm in making sure your plants have a steady source of calcium. As the eggshells break down, they’ll nourish the soil, and your plants.

2. Use eggshells as pots for starting plants from seed. Then plant the seedling, “pot” and all, into the garden.

3. Use crushed eggshells to deter slugs, snails, and cutworms. These garden pests are a real pain in the gardener’s neck, and cutworms are the worst, killing seedlings by severing the stems at soil level. All three of these pests have soft undersides, and dislike slithering across anything sharp. Crushed eggshells, applied to the soil’s surface, may help deter these pests.

4. Add them to the compost pile. If you aren’t planting tomatoes or trying to deter slugs, add the eggshells to your compost pile, where they’ll add calcium to your finished compost.

5. If you are feeding birds in your yard, crush up the eggshells and add them to a dish near the feeder. Female birds, particularly those who are getting ready to lay eggs or recently finished laying, require extra calcium and will definitely appreciate it!

No matter how you want to use them, be sure to rinse the shells out well before using them in the garden.

Happy blogging!

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